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TRR photos by Kristin Barron

Snowdrops re-emerge

The search for spring

Spring is a magician. A sort of “now you see it, now you don’t” kind of swindler. My case in point: the diminutive snowdrop flowers that appeared in my lawn in fearless, full bloom on March 1 that then disappeared under the drifts of all that March snow we endured.


TRR photo by Jonathan Charles Fox

Last week, Town of Bethel Supervisor Dan Sturm went over details of the new dog park under construction in Smallwood, NY as Caroline Akt and others listened in.

Small-town life

I’m a product of the “baby-boomer” generation. Defined as “those born between 1946 and 1964,” the “boom” generation consists of some 72 million of us (www.cnn.com) sprawled across the nation.


TRR photo by Sandy Long

Tick populations are soaring throughout the Upper Delaware River region, and ticks that were once uncommon, such as the lone star tick depicted here, are increasing in number. According to the PA Department of Health, Pennsylvania has led the nation in confirmed cases of Lyme disease for three straight years. The black-legged deer tick is the species most likely to transmit Lyme disease and has been found in each of Pennsylvania’s 67 counties. Visit https://bit.ly/2HtmxTJ to learn more. Download the Pennsylvania Recreation and Park Society’s helpful informational brochure on ticks at https://bit.ly/2HC3nIL. The PA Lyme Resource Network offers additional information at www.palyme.org.
 

Tick time

Although I’d prefer not to be the bearer of bad news, there’s no avoiding the fact that it’s tick time in the Upper Delaware River region. My dogs have already had several, and I came home from a 30-minute photo ramble in Pike County recently with four blacklegged tick nymphs making their way up the legs of my pants.


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Opening Day

Opening Day. The words opening day mean different things to different people. For example if you’re a Yankees fan, it means opening day at the ball park. But if you are a trout fisherman, fly fisher, or otherwise, it means only one thing: winter is over, and it’s time to load the car and head to the river.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Artist Peter Max was one of the first to heavily merchandise his ‘60s-inspired works—and some of them, including these colorful hot pants and see-through umbrella are on exhibit at The Museum at Bethel Woods.

Writer’s block

They say that “a picture is worth a thousand words,” and I hope it’s true, because it would appear that I’ve actually (gasp!) run out of words.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

Robins are considered by many to be the first sign of spring, as flocks of them arrive in the region. However, some robins are present all winter here, if they can find a reliable food source; leftover berries or fruit on bushes are favored.

Some of spring’s arrivals

It’s hard to think of the coming of spring as I write this, because it is still snowing outside. No, not the 15 inches of snow we got a few weeks ago, which, with the wind, caused widespread damage throughout the region. No, this is just a dusting of wet snow that promises to melt with warming afternoon temperatures.

Leaving

“Everything makes me sad,” I said, as we drove through the city on our way out of town on a recent Saturday. I couldn’t explain it at the time, but I felt its effects. We are making plans for the move I have wanted to make for nearly 20 years. To our home in Narrowsburg, NY, as full-time residents. I should be gloriously happy.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

Five-year-old Luke was all smiles when showing off his bucket of eggs collected at the annual Easter eggstravaganza held in the Town of Bethel last weekend.

I won’t grow up

That song, sung by Mary Martin in the musical version of J.M. Barrie’s “Peter Pan,” and the sentiment it expressed, has stayed with me since I first heard it at age five. “I won’t grow up, I don’t want to wear a tie. Or a serious expression, in the middle of July.

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