Outdoors


TRR photos by Scott Rando

Cardinals can be found year-round in the region and also are attracted to feeders.  In the wild, they can be found near fields and shrubby forest edges.  They also like many backyards, and at the feeder they favor sunflower seeds.

Where are the birds?

Our editor, Anne Willard, recently mentioned to me that she had seen concern expressed about the apparent lack of small birds in the a region via the online Upper Delaware network. People were worried because birds were not visiting their feeders, and they were not hearing many birds calling in the woods as they had earlier.

Golden eagles of New York

NARROWSBURG, NY — Join the Delaware Highlands Conservancy for a free presentation on golden eagles on Saturday, November 25 at 1 p.m. at The Narrowsburg Union. Peg DiBenedetto of the Eastern Golden Eagle Project will discuss the population of winter resident golden eagles of New York State.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

As its name implies, the variable oakleaf caterpillar feeds on all species of oaks, with a preference for white oaks. It will also consume species such as beech, basswood, paper birch, American elm, and occasionally walnut, black birch and hawthorn.

A collection of caterpillars

Most of us would recognize the fuzzy black-and-brown-banded woolly bear caterpillar or the distinctive monarch caterpillar and its striking bands of yellow, black and white. But there are many caterpillars we might encounter in the Upper Delaware River region that are more challenging to identify.

PEEC hosts events in November

DINGMANS FERRY, PA — Pocono Environmental Education Center (PEEC) at 538 Emery Rd. will host a variety of events in November, starting with “Fire Building” on Saturday, November 4 from 10 a.m. to 12 noon. Learn to make fire without matches by employing techniques that involve sparks and found or prepared tinder. For ages 10 and over.


TRR photo by Scott Rando

The lower of these two sub-adult bald eagles is R27, a New York radio-tagged eagle captured two years prior. New York State is also experiencing issues concerning lead toxicity in bald eagles. A 22-year study where 300 bald eagles were screened for lead has shown that about 17% had high levels of lead, high enough to be lethal.
 

PA Game Commission: Bald eagle lead poisoning on the rise

It’s mid-January in a conifer forest with a few clearings within. On the ground, at the edge of one of the clearings, sits an adult bald eagle. It’s not by choice the eagle is sitting on the ground; a few days back it started to experience awkwardness in flight.

A chance at fall spawners

For anglers living in central and western New York, fall is the time to fish tributaries of the Finger Lakes and the Great Lakes. This is the time of year when runs a pacific salmon, brown trout and land-locked Atlantic salmon begin their spawning migrations.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

This wood frog was resting under the leaf litter in my yard, where it will eventually overwinter. Due to their light tan coloration, wood frogs are well camouflaged by fallen foliage. An easily identifiable characteristic is the dark mask that stretches from the frog’s eye to just behind its eardrum.

Lurking in the leaf litter

While raking leaves in my yard recently, one suddenly leapt away from me. Similar in color to the foliage on the ground, the leaper turned out to be a wood frog, who probably didn’t appreciate my disruption. The truth is, most animals prefer their habitats to be ungroomed, and as unaltered from their natural state as possible.

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