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October 22, 2016
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River Talk

River ramble

History has shown that rivers, in general, have been used as meeting places and places to settle. Even in pre-European settlement times, Indian tribes used rivers for both living areas and a food source. Locally, Lenape artifacts recovered near the Delaware River have shown that net fishing was greatly utilized and fresh water mussels were a major food source. Sometimes while walking near the river, a flint arrowhead could be found by a woodchuck burrow in the mound of excavated dirt.  Read more

Natural wellness

“Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul,” asserted author, naturalist and conservationist John Muir. Although Muir died in 1914, his legacy continues to influence and inspire us today.  Read more

Spring gobblers

During the year, I have been seeing a lot of turkey activity in area forests and fields as they scratch up the leaf litter, forage for food, or walk in the snow, leaving footprints with the toes perfectly aligned from one step to the next. Earlier this spring, a new sound could be heard; the loud report of a male, or “gobbler,” resounding through the woods as he tries to entice a female through ruffled feathers, fan-tail displays and strutting. These are the sights and sounds of the courtship and breeding season for turkeys, aka the spring gobbler season.  Read more

Rehabbing regional wildlife

A month or so ago, I transported a female downy woodpecker to the Pocono Wildlife Rehabilitation and Education Center (PWRC) in Stroudsburg, PA after my neighbor found it in her driveway, suffering from what appeared to be a broken wing. The tiny bird’s feisty spirit kept it strong enough to make the trip and upon intake, its prognosis was deemed to be good.  Read more

Birding events this weekend

With spring’s arrival, most of the migratory birds that were gone all winter have arrived to start their breeding activities. A few birds, loons for example, are migrating through the region to points north. More bird songs are heard in the mornings now and even at night; last night, I was awakened by the call of a barred owl (“Hoo…hoo…who cooks for you?”). It’s the time of year that bird walks and other events are being held by local bird clubs and other organizations.  Read more

The wonder of woodcocks

Lucky me, to chance upon a most delightful bird last week. At the edge of a Pennsylvania State Game Lands parking area was an adult American woodcock and her four wee babies. They hastily scurried into the forest, except for the one depicted here, who froze in place long enough for a few quick photos before Mom came bobbing back to retrieve her baby.  Read more

Spring emergence

People usually associate spring with the appearance of daffodils and emerging buds from plants in the garden. Indeed, there are many cultivated plants appearing now. Greens from garlic and other good things from vegetable plots are showing themselves, offering promises of tasty culinary delights a little later in the season.  Read more

Seizing spring

Spring has sprung, and along with it, a host of fun and informative opportunities to get out of the house and into the world of nature and its endless wonders. Make plans now to seize every chance to connect with this rejuvenating season.

From April 22 to 24, Hawley EarthFest takes place in and around the town of Hawley, PA. Activities for all ages are planned, including an Environmental Expo in Bingham Park and the ever-popular Species Parade. See the full schedule of events at www.hawleyearthfest.com/schedule.  Read more

Breeding eagle update

A question that has been on my mind—and probably on the minds of a few other people—is how the unusually warm late winter and early spring would affect breeding eagles in the region. Nature’s timing of breeding and migration events (called phenology) occurs at approximately the same time each year for any given species, but can be influenced to some extent by weather conditions.  Read more

About beavers

Have you ever encountered North America’s largest rodent? Even if you’ve never witnessed a live beaver in action, chances are you’ve seen the results of its handiwork, in the form of dome-like lodges, dams and the resultant ponds and wetlands that are created, or the chiseled stumps of trees harvested by these 30- to 60-pound semi-aquatic mammals.  Read more

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