Blogs & Columns


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

General Manager Paul Ciliberto, event co-chair Greg Goldstein and Boys & Girls Clubs Program Leader Barbi Neumann Marty stand behind the kids who stopped in to personally deliver their donation during the two-day Thunder 102 Country Cares for St. Jude Radiothon.

Once more, with feeling!

As the first snowflakes flutter from the sky, the cavalcade of seasonal events begin anew, offering me the opportunity to re-think, re-do and renew. They say that with each passing year, the time flies more quickly and now that I’m over 40 (LOL) I can see what “they” mean.

The split(s)

[Peace and Justice Files columnist Skip Mendler, having spent three months helping with refugee assistance in Serbia, is now back in Krefeld, Germany, doing local volunteer work, performing with a refugee theatre group, and contemplating his next move.]

I don’t know if you remember your first time… undergoing cell division, that is.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

Look for this marker to locate the trailhead along Watts Hill Road, which can be found by following Church Street through Honesdale and turning right just after crossing the bridge where Church Street concludes. Straight ahead, you’ll spot the trailhead marker. The trail, along with several side trails, provides a good challenge to one’s cardiovascular system. There is also a paved road leading to a parking lot atop the cliff. Access that location via Gibbons Park Road.

Seize these wintry days

As winter weather visits the Upper Delaware River region, the temptation to stay indoors can be overwhelming. We find ourselves becoming more sedentary, when what we really need is to gear up with layered clothing and head out into the bracing air and stark beauty of the season.

Prepping for a cozy winter

I love autumn and all the rituals of buttoning down for the winter—unpacking the heavier quilts, putting the garden to bed, outfitting the screen doors with storm windows and building the woodpile in preparation for evenings around the wood stove.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

“The Moth” storytellers Adam Wade, left,  Ophira Eisenberg and Peter Aguerro, held the audience in the palm of their respective hands at the Hurleyville Arts Centre last weekend.

Tell me a story

Thanks to Mom and the ritual of bedtime storytelling, one of my earliest recollections is drifting off to sleep hearing “Charlotte’s Web” read aloud, chapter by chapter, and the building excitement anticipating how the story might unfold.


TRR photos by Scott Rando

Cardinals can be found year-round in the region and also are attracted to feeders.  In the wild, they can be found near fields and shrubby forest edges.  They also like many backyards, and at the feeder they favor sunflower seeds.

Where are the birds?

Our editor, Anne Willard, recently mentioned to me that she had seen concern expressed about the apparent lack of small birds in the a region via the online Upper Delaware network. People were worried because birds were not visiting their feeders, and they were not hearing many birds calling in the woods as they had earlier.


TRR photos by Jonathan Charles Fox

DJ Adam Owens (and his gigantic head) was a hit with the crowd at the Western Hotel’s annual Halloween bash.

Who am I anyway?

That question, famously asked in the 1975 Broadway musical “A Chorus Line” often haunts me. “Am I my resumé? That is a picture of a person I don’t know.” I think that most of us, from time to time, experience an identity crisis of one sort or another, often brought on by having to play a variety of roles in life.


TRR photos by Sandy Long

As its name implies, the variable oakleaf caterpillar feeds on all species of oaks, with a preference for white oaks. It will also consume species such as beech, basswood, paper birch, American elm, and occasionally walnut, black birch and hawthorn.

A collection of caterpillars

Most of us would recognize the fuzzy black-and-brown-banded woolly bear caterpillar or the distinctive monarch caterpillar and its striking bands of yellow, black and white. But there are many caterpillars we might encounter in the Upper Delaware River region that are more challenging to identify.

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